Arts Review

Avengers: Endgame: A waste of time, money and talent

By Josh Varlin, 20 May 2019

Endgame is more of a business enterprise than a work of art or cultural artifact.

The Eyes of Orson Welles: A markedly political approach to the American filmmaker …

… and John & Yoko: Above Us Only Sky (about John Lennon’s 1971 album Imagine )

By Joanne Laurier, 17 May 2019

A generally left-wing figure shaped by the Great Depression and the impact of the Russian Revolution, filmmaker Orson Welles (1915-1985) was artistically demanding and for the most part found Hollywood nightmarish.

Doris Day, prominent postwar American actress and singer, dies at 97

By David Walsh, 15 May 2019

Her most compelling performances came in films such as Young Man with a Horn (1950), Love Me or Leave Me (1955) and, above all, Alfred Hitchcock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956).

San Francisco Board of Education to decide on the fate of historic murals said to be “offensive”

By Toby Reese, 13 May 2019

A “Reflection and Action Group,” dominated by identity politics, has recommended removing murals at George Washington High School. The action would erase a striking work that treats important issues in US history.

Wild Nights with Emily: American poet Emily Dickinson undone by gender politics

By Joanne Laurier and David Walsh, 10 May 2019

By concentrating almost exclusively on Emily Dickinson’s supposed sexual relationship with her sister-in-law, filmmaker Madeleine Olnek and her collaborators recreate the poet in their own petty, self-absorbed image.

Clergy: An uncompromising film about the hypocrisy and corruption of the Catholic Church in Poland

By Stefan Steinberg, 8 May 2019

Wojciech Smarzowski’s latest offering was released in Poland in the autumn of 2018 and broke several box office records.

Red Joan: A British spy story skirts some issues

By Fred Mazelis, 6 May 2019

The film is loosely based on the case of Melita Norwood, arrested in 1999 and accused of passing classified information to the Soviet Union.

Documentary about the brutal 2014 disappearance of teachers’ college students

The 43: A state massacre and cover-up in Mexico

By Rafael Azul and Don Knowland, 4 May 2019

The documentary on Netflix exposes the role of the military in the 2014 disappearance of 43 rural teaching students and the government’s cover-up of this atrocity.

Michigan State University performs stirring rendition of Babi Yar, Dmitri Shostakovich’s anti-fascist symphony

By Nancy Hanover, 1 May 2019

Shostakovich’s masterpiece was performed by the Michigan State Symphony Orchestra, the University Chorale, the State Singers, noted baritone Mark Rucker and conductor Christopher James Lees at Detroit’s Orchestra Hall on April 27-28.

Unexpectedly restrained: Italian filmmaker Matteo Garrone’s Dogman

By Emanuele Saccarelli, 27 April 2019

Dogman, which has now opened in the US, is a serious attempt to deal with a difficult, and in this climate not especially promising subject—a notorious and horrific murder in Rome in 1988.

Some films from the 2019 San Francisco International Film Festival—Part 1

Paper Flags, Tehran: City of Love and Belmonte—Alienation, loneliness and other problems

By David Walsh, 26 April 2019

Paper Flags, Tehran: City of Love and Belmonte—three films from France, Iran and Uruguay, respectively—were screened at the recent San Francisco film festival.

How Did Lubitsch Do It?: Joseph McBride’s engaging study of filmmaker Ernst Lubitsch

By David Walsh, 24 April 2019

Lubitsch, born in Berlin in 1892, first directed silent films in Germany and, after his move to Hollywood in 1922, directed silent and then sound films in the US. He is best known today for his American movies of the 1930s and 1940s.

An interview with film historian and biographer Joseph McBride, author of How Did Lubitsch Do It?

By David Walsh, 24 April 2019

David Walsh recently spoke to Joseph McBride, the author of a new study of filmmaker Ernst Lubitsch, famed for The Marriage Circle, Trouble in Paradise, Design for Living, The Shop Around the Corner, To Be or Not to Be and other films.

The stagnation of American poetry: The Best American Poetry 2018

By James McDonald, 20 April 2019

For the most part, these are eminently safe poems, carefully dressed, peer reviewed and scrupulously attentive to contemporary cultural regulations of taste.

The burning of Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris

By Alex Lantier, 17 April 2019

The inferno was caused by a horrific breakdown of fire safety in restoration work, for which the French government and ruling elite bear the responsibility.

Freep Film Festival 2019 in Detroit—Part 1

Glimpses of social life: The Feeling of Being Watched, Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool and Bill Traylor: Chasing Ghosts, among others

By David Walsh and Helen Halyard, 17 April 2019

The Detroit film festival organizers made an obvious effort to program works oriented toward contemporary reality and recent social history, including many of their difficult and painful aspects.

Chicago symphony musicians strike defies aristocratic principle

By Kristina Betinis, 13 April 2019

As CSO strike enters sixth week, a right-wing pressure campaign is being mounted to try to force the musicians to make concessions on their pensions.

Ash is the Purest White: Finding one’s way in “the new ‘capitalist’ China”

And Working Woman from Israel

By David Walsh, 13 April 2019

Jia Zhangke has demonstrated a concern with the fate of workers and others whose lives have been turned upside down by the full integration of China into the global capitalist economy.

Emilio Estevez’s The Public: The homeless refuse to freeze to death

By Joanne Laurier, 11 April 2019

A group of homeless people in Cincinnati resist being thrown out of a public library onto the streets on an especially frigid night.

Flint, a play at the University of Michigan: Stuck, unfortunately, in the quagmire of racial politics

By Joanne Laurier, 10 April 2019

José Casas’ drama is a response to the horrendous Flint, Michigan water crisis, which began in April 2014. As a result, the city’s poisoned population has suffered disease, death and untold misery.

“Tarrafal Never Again!” exhibition in Lisbon exposes horrors of Portugal’s fascist concentration camp

By Charles Hixson and Paul Mitchell, 9 April 2019

The museum exhibition includes photographs of the arid, isolated prison, Portuguese government dossiers detailing the lives and deaths of individual prisoners under the most wretched conditions, and moving testimony from survivors.

Netflix’s Trigger Warning with Killer Mike: Provocation and pessimism from the Atlanta rap artist

By Nick Barrickman, 8 April 2019

With Trigger Warning, rapper Michael “Killer Mike” Render combines occasional flashes of insight and intellectual courage with a tendency to resort to mere shock tactics or juvenile behavior.

Jordan Peele’s horror film, Us: “Us” and them

By Kevin Martinez, 6 April 2019

Director Jordan Peele’s latest horror film tells the story of a vacationing family stalked by their doppelgängers. The results are murky, pretentious and strangely unaffecting.

Major retrospective at the Whitney Museum in New York City

“Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again”: The artist who wasn’t there

By Erik Schreiber, 30 March 2019

A recent retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art provided an occasion to re-examine Warhol’s work and evaluate what it means for American and global art.

In defense of To Kill a Mockingbird: The 1962 film about racism in theaters this week

By Joanne Laurier and David Walsh, 28 March 2019

Fathom Events, TCM and Universal Pictures are screening To Kill a Mockingbird in select cinemas this week. The Robert Mulligan movie is based on Harper Lee’s 1960 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same title.

This Giant Beast That Is the Global Economy: Why the lack of seriousness?

By Joanne Laurier, 26 March 2019

An Amazon Prime original, This Giant Beast That Is the Global Economy is an eight-episode documentary series that purports to make sense of a complex global situation.

69th Berlin International Film Festival—Part 9

Three Turkish films (A Tale of Three Sisters, Daughters of Two Worlds, Oray)—Hoping for a better life

By Bernd Reinhardt, 25 March 2019

Three films at the Berlinale ​​exude a humanistic spirit of enlightenment and dialogue. They suggest that everyone, regardless of their ethnic, religious or cultural background, has the right to a better life.

Don McCullin at Tate Britain in London

Veteran photographer calls on young people to chronicle today’s “social wars”

By Paul Mitchell, 23 March 2019

“There isn’t a city in England you can’t go to and find some poverty and unhappiness and tragedies.”—Don McCullin

Season 5 of animated series BoJack Horseman addresses #MeToo campaign, with mixed results

By Josh Varlin, 22 March 2019

The show is too savvy to be a simple #MeToo parable about its protagonist’s fall from grace, although the anti-democratic campaign does find reflection.

69th Berlin International Film Festival—Part 8

Increasing pressures on Chinese filmmakers

By Stefan Steinberg, 21 March 2019

In February, the deputy director of the Chinese Communist Party’s Central Propaganda Department declared that the country’s filmmakers “must have a clear ideological bottom line and cannot challenge the political system.”

Captain Marvel: Money, feminism, militarism and previously “independent” filmmakers

By David Walsh, 20 March 2019

The production and release of Captain Marvel, the new science fiction adventure from Marvel and Disney, has a number of remarkable features, but none of them involve the film’s drama, action or characters.

Legendary “Wrecking Crew” drummer Hal Blaine dead at 90

By Hiram Lee, 19 March 2019

Drummer Hal Blaine died March 11, one month past his 90th birthday. Blaine was an incredibly prolific studio musician who appeared on countless recordings during the 1960s and 1970s.

69th Berlin International Film Festival—Part 7

German films: Economic and social tensions on the rise

By Bernd Reinhardt, 16 March 2019

The pursuit of naked profit interests and government-imposed austerity dominate an ever broader swath of life. Some of the German films at this year’s Berlinale point to the consequences.

“This is not just about Tchaikovsky, it’s about culture as a whole”

Chicago Symphony Orchestra musicians strike to defend pensions

By Kristina Betinis, 12 March 2019

CSO players and supporters demand funding for the arts, not wars.

What lies behind the campaign against famed conductor Daniel Barenboim?

By Clara Weiss, 12 March 2019

A central concern of the drive in Berlin against Barenboim must be his longstanding criticism of Israeli occupation and the oppression of the Palestinian people.

Actor Bruno Ganz, prominent on stage and screen for more than 40 years: an obituary

By Sybille Fuchs, 9 March 2019

On February 16, Swiss-born actor Bruno Ganz, aged 77, died of cancer at his home on Lake Zurich. Ganz was one of the leading figures in the contemporary German-speaking theatre and film world.

André Previn, versatile composer, conductor and pianist, dies at 89

By Fred Mazelis, 7 March 2019

Previn was often compared to Leonard Bernstein, for the breadth of his achievements and his insistence on appealing to a broad public.

Why is there so little media skepticism about Leaving Neverland and its allegations against Michael Jackson?

By David Walsh, 6 March 2019

Leaving Neverland consists principally of two men, Wade Robson and James Safechuck, detailing their claims that singer Michael Jackson sexually abused them over the course of many years, in the 1980s and 1990s.

On the Basis of Sex and Ruth Bader Ginsburg: The manufacturing of a “living legend”

By Ed Hightower, 2 March 2019

The two-hour biopic—a tedious cinematic effort—seeks to rally a core constituency of the Democratic Party: upper-middle-class women.

Behind the racist backlash against Green Book

By Hiram Lee and Andre Damon, 26 February 2019

Its central crime, the critics declare, is the view that racial prejudice is a social problem that can be solved through education, reason and empathy, and that racial hatred is not an essential component of the human condition.

69th Berlin International Film Festival—Part 2

Midnight Traveler—“Sometimes life takes you through hell”

By Verena Nees, 22 February 2019

The film provides an authentic and moving portrayal of people just like us, who just happen to live in the wrong country at the wrong time.

The Progressive Revolution: Modern Art for a New India

Modern Indian art at the Asia Society Museum in New York

By Josh Varlin and Evan Cohen, 20 February 2019

The Progressive Artists’ Group brought together remarkable artists whose works express the democratic and anti-imperialist sentiments of millions as the British Raj ended.

Prazdnik (Holiday): Film about social inequality in Russia attracts mass audience

By Clara Weiss, 18 February 2019

The film is a poignant indictment of social inequality and has been subject to a campaign of Russian government censorship.

The 2019 Grammy Awards: The music industry’s love affair with itself

By Matthew Brennan, 14 February 2019

The now ubiquitous and mandatory theme of every awards show—identity politics—was on heavy display Sunday.

At St. Ann’s Warehouse Theater in Brooklyn

The Jungle: A makeshift society within the global refugee crisis

By Owen Mullan, 13 February 2019

Playwrights Joe Murphy and Joe Robertson have created a thoughtful treatment of one of humanity’s most acute social crises.

Velvet Buzzsaw: The horror of the art world

By David Walsh, 12 February 2019

Dan Gilroy is one of the more interesting American filmmakers currently working.

Woody Allen sues Amazon for failing to distribute his latest film and other breaches of contract

By David Walsh, 9 February 2019

Amazon’s refusal to distribute Allen’s film and honor its contract with him is a brazen act of censorship that is the direct product of the #MeToo witch hunt.

Fire in my mouth: New York Philharmonic premieres oratorio on the 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist Fire

By Fred Mazelis, 6 February 2019

The hour-long work probes an infamous example—in New York City in 1911—of capitalist exploitation and the sacrifice of workers’ lives on the altar of private profit.

The Land of Steady Habits: Postcrash American disillusionment

By David Walsh, 5 February 2019

The film follows Anders Hill, who has recently quit his job on Wall Street and divorced his wife of several decades, Helene. The events unfold in southwest Connecticut, in New York City’s affluent suburbs.

Leyla McCalla’s Capitalist Blues: Keeping one’s eyes open

By Matthew Brennan, 2 February 2019

Trained as a classical cellist, McCalla’s eventual decision to pursue folk-based music and song-writing led her to the rich New Orleans music environment where she has been a fixture for much of the past decade.

Vanity Fair: A new television adaptation of the great 19th century novel

By David Walsh, 1 February 2019

William Makepeace Thackeray’s work, a remarkable social satire and picture of life, is set during and after the Napoleonic Wars, with the Battle of Waterloo in June 1815 playing a role in the events.

Beautiful Boy: Part of the truth about drug addiction

By Joanne Laurier, 30 January 2019

The movie deals with the subject of drug addiction—a national public health emergency and social crisis, and the source of immense suffering.

Critic-at-large Wesley Morris on the Academy Awards

Why does the New York Times keep pushing pernicious racialism?

By David Walsh, 28 January 2019

The New York Times critic-at-large Wesley Morris published an article January 23 headlined “Why Do the Oscars Keep Falling for Racial Reconciliation Fantasies?”

100 years since the founding of the Bauhaus

Including an interview with Bauhaus student Wilf Franks

By Barbara Slaughter and Stefan Steinberg, 25 January 2019

This year marks the 100 anniversary of the founding of the Bauhaus movement in Germany, which played a key role in the development of progressive art and culture in the twentieth century.

The 2019 Academy Award nominations: Filmmaking, money and identity politics

By David Walsh, 23 January 2019

The 91st awards ceremony will be held February 24 at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles.

Leeds’ Opera North commemorates end of World War I—Part 2

Silent Night, Songs of Love and Battle, Symphony of Sorrowful Songs, Last Days, Not Such Quiet Girls

By Barbara Slaughter, 23 January 2019

Opera North staged a week of performances November 30-December 7 to commemorate the end of World War I. Included were two new commissions by the company and the British premier of Silent Night.

Leeds’ Opera North commemorates end of World War I—Part 1

Silent Night, Songs of Love and Battle, Symphony of Sorrowful Songs, Last Days, Not Such Quiet Girls

By Barbara Slaughter, 22 January 2019

Opera North staged a week of performances November 30-December 7 to commemorate the end of World War I. Included were two new commissions by the company and the British premier of Silent Night.

School: BBC documentary reveals impact of education cuts

By Tom Pearce and Paul Mitchell, 21 January 2019

In the documentary, we witness the distress resulting from teacher shortages, large class sizes, dilapidated buildings and insufficient support for children with special needs, all in pursuit of “balancing the budget.”

Bird Box and Hold the Dark: Looking at things in the face or not

By Joanne Laurier, 19 January 2019

Netflix began streaming Bird Box on December 21 and, a week later, reported that the film had the largest seven-day viewership, 45 million accounts, of any of its original productions.

An exhibition of the great 17th century Dutch painter

Frans Hals Portraits: A Family Reunion at the Toledo Museum of Art

By David Walsh, 17 January 2019

The Dutch “Golden Age” produced a host of extraordinary artistic figures, including most prominently Rembrandt van Rijn (1606–69), Hals (c. 1582–1666) and Johannes Vermeer (1632–1675).

The Largesse of the Sea Maiden—Short stories by American author Denis Johnson

By Sandy English, 15 January 2019

Johnson (1949-2017) wrote convincingly and often movingly about the painful personal conundrums that people found themselves in, particularly as social conditions declined in the US in the 1970s and beyond.

We The Workers: A limited documentary about labour rights groups in China

By Richard Phillips, 14 January 2019

The main problem of We The Workers is not the director’s stylistic approach but the film’s uncritical attitude towards the political agenda of the labour activists.

Steins;Gate 0: A sequel to the popular time-travel anime series

By Matthew MacEgan, 12 January 2019

One of the top anime series of 2018, based on a 2015 video game of the same name, deals with a small group of friends who discover a way to time travel, with dangerous consequences.

Actors and stage managers strike against developmental work with Broadway League

By Katy Kinner, 11 January 2019

The National Council of the Actors’ Equity union announced a strike on Monday, calling for a new contract.

South Park episodes dramatize plight of Amazon workers, ridicule Jeff Bezos

By Ed Hightower, 9 January 2019

The two comic episodes, Unfulfilled and Bike Parade, sympathize with rebellious Amazon workers while depicting billionaire Jeff Bezos as a Talosian, an alien from Star Trek bent on the enslavement of humanity.

Min Jin Lee’s Pachinko: A novel of 20th century Korea and Japan—“History has failed us, but no matter”

By Sandy English, 7 January 2019

Pachinko describes the struggles of four generations of Koreans in Japan. The New York Times named it one of the 10 best novels of 2017.

Netflix’s The Innocent Man: The American injustice system

By Joanne Laurier, 5 January 2019

The six-episode documentary released in December is based on bestselling novelist John Grisham’s only non-fiction effort. The miniseries chronicles the wrongful incarceration of four men in the 1980s in Ada, Oklahoma.

“Life is forbidden to us … do you want to comply with that?”: The rediscovery of Ulrich Alexander Boschwitz’s The Traveler in Germany

By Clara Weiss, 4 January 2019

Though written 80 years ago, The Traveler is not just a remarkable literary document of the Nazi period, but speaks immediately to the major political and historical questions of our time.

Clint Eastwood’s The Mule: The world’s oldest drug courier

By Kevin Martinez, 3 January 2019

Eastwood’s latest film fictionally dramatizes the potentially intriguing true story of Leo Sharp, an elderly World War II veteran and horticulturist who smuggled drugs for a Mexican cartel. However, it is a conformist and clichéd work.

Best film and television of 2018

By David Walsh and Joanne Laurier, 31 December 2018

The film world in 2018 can be viewed and judged in different ways and by distinct standards.

Musical highlights of 2018

By Matthew Brennan and Hiram Lee, 31 December 2018

Many of the year’s best musicians refused to limit themselves to one “lane,” “border,” genre or supposedly separate culture.

Vice: A portrait of an American corporate-military gangster

By David Walsh and Joanne Laurier, 29 December 2018

In regard to the Bush-Cheney administration, the WSWS pointed in the early 2000s to an unprecedented development, the “rise to the pinnacle of the American political system of elements of a gangster character.”

Mary Queen of Scots and The Favourite: The unimpressive recent results of “women in film”

By Joanne Laurier, 24 December 2018

Mary Queen of Scots and The Favourite belong to this year’s flood of “women” films. Many others have already disappeared without a trace.

Her photos shed light on history: The outstanding work of photographer Maria Austria (1915-75)

By Verena Nees, 22 December 2018

Her work deserves to be exhibited in one of Germany’s or Austria’s major museums, not least because she is the source of the only photographic record of the hiding place of Anne Frank and her family before deportation to Auschwitz.

French Romantic painter Eugène Delacroix at the Metropolitan Museum in New York

By Clare Hurley, 20 December 2018

The powerful exhibition is the first major survey of the artist’s work in half a century. It brings together 150 paintings, drawings, prints and manuscripts that have rarely been shown together.

Nancy Wilson (1937-2018), an extraordinary singer who will be missed

By John Andrews, 19 December 2018

Nancy Wilson, a distinctive vocalist for more than 50 years, and the long-time host of NPR’s “Jazz Profiles,” passed away last week.

Russian television’s Trotsky serial: A degraded spectacle of historical falsification and anti-Semitism

By Fred Williams and David North, 19 December 2018

The eight-part mini-series, now available on Netflix, is an exhibition of the political, intellectual and cultural depravity of all those involved in its production. This comment was originally posted in November 2017.

Alfonso Cuarón’s Roma: Art and struggle

By Rafael Azul, 17 December 2018

Roma is a sensitive portrait of a family breaking apart in the broader context of a social crisis. It follows Cleo, a Mixtec Indian, as she performs her daily chores, which include caring for the family’s four children.

Bodyguard: A political thriller in six episodes from the UK

By David Walsh, 15 December 2018

The series centers on a British Army veteran, David Budd, suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Budd now serves as an officer with a branch of the police in charge of security for politicians.

The ignorant, repressive attack on Frank Loesser’s “Baby, It’s Cold Outside”

By David Walsh, 14 December 2018

In the song, as it is generally performed, a man encourages a woman to stay the night and she expresses concerns about what her family and the neighbors will think if she does.

Wildlife: American dreams and discouragement

And Can You Ever Forgive Me?

By Joanne Laurier, 13 December 2018

Set in 1960 in Great Falls, Montana, Wildlife is a relatively somber look at postwar American life. Can You Ever Forgive Me? focuses on an eccentric forger.

Icebox: The US government locks up children

By David Walsh, 11 December 2018

Icebox  focuses on a 12-year-old Honduran boy, Oscar (Anthony Gonzalez), forced by gang activity to flee his home country and head for the US, where an uncle lives.

Protest at Whitney Museum in New York calls for ouster of trustee who owns tear gas firm

By Sandy English, 10 December 2018

Warren B. Kanders is the chairman and founder of Safariland, a defense firm that produces the tear gas used in the police-military attack on migrant workers at the US-Mexico border crossing in San Ysidro on November 25.

Maria by Callas: A documentary on the life of the famed opera singer

By Joanne Laurier, 8 December 2018

Tom Volf’s Maria by Callas, about the legendary Greek-American opera soprano, has opened in the US.

A quarter-century since the release of Steven Spielberg’s film

The achievement of Schindler’s List

By David Walsh, 7 December 2018

Schindler’s List opened in movie theaters in the US in December 1993. A restored version is now playing in selected theaters. We are reposting today a review published in the International Workers Bulletin, a forerunner of the WSWS, in January 1994.

The Front Runner: An American political scandal

And Widows, Bohemian Rhapsody

By Joanne Laurier, 6 December 2018

Jason Reitman’s The Front Runner chronicles the downfall of Gary Hart, the leading contender for the 1988 Democratic Party presidential nomination, whose campaign was abruptly brought to an end by a sex scandal.

Submission: A college professor undone by sexual harassment allegations

By David Walsh, 4 December 2018

Given the film’s subject matter, the generally hostile or condescending treatment Submission received at the hands of the major film critics in March 2018 should not have come as a surprise.

“Well-paid journalists have become gormless cyphers of the propaganda of war”

John Pilger discusses his “The Power of the Documentary” film festival

By Richard Phillips, 3 December 2018

Veteran journalist and filmmaker John Pilger spoke with the WSWS last week about his film festival and the political issues confronting serious journalists today.

I object—Ian Hislop’s search for dissent: An exhibition that eradicates socialist ideas and revolutionary action

At the British Museum, London

By Paul Mitchell, 1 December 2018

Would-be satirist Ian Hislop had access to one of the world’s most magnificent collections, in the British Museum, but ends up producing an exercise in political, social and artistic emptiness.

Italian filmmaker Bernardo Bertolucci dies at 77

By Richard Phillips and David Walsh, 28 November 2018

Bertolucci will be remembered for valuable films he made in the 1960s and 1970s, including La commare secca (1962—English title, The Grim Reaper), Before the Revolution (1964), The Conformist (1970) and 1900 (1976).

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs: Only a fool “expects better” from humanity

By David Walsh, 26 November 2018

The Coens’ latest film is made up of six stories set in a mythical “Old West.” The thread connecting the various episodes is a generally nasty attitude toward humanity, and American humanity in particular.

Leonard Bernstein’s operetta Candide at the University of Michigan

By Joanne Laurier, 23 November 2018

Bernstein adapted his musical from Voltaire’s 1759 novella, an influential work of the Enlightenment that satirized established religion, government and philosophy.

Showtime’s Kidding with Jim Carrey: Everyone has a breaking point

By Ed Hightower, 20 November 2018

The often humorous drama follows beloved children’s television personality, Mr. Pickles, through personal and social tragedy.

250 Kidding review

19 November 2018

Web television series Homecoming: Everything about America’s wars, corporate elite is “rotten” …

… And two much weaker series, Maniac and Wanderlust

By David Walsh and Joanne Laurier, 17 November 2018

Homecoming, a compelling, disturbing 10-episode web television series, concerns itself with a facility in Florida that supposedly helps Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans.

Peter Jackson’s They Shall Not Grow Old: A devastating depiction of the horrors of war

By Paul Bond, 15 November 2018

Jackson’s documentary, assembled from footage shot in World War I and soldiers’ oral recollections, has resonated with millions of people.

David Hare’s political thriller Collateral: “War has entered the blood”

By David Walsh, 14 November 2018

The series begins with the shooting death of a south London pizza delivery man. The murderer, we soon learn, is a female British army captain, who believes she has killed an Iraqi “terrorist.”

The Hate U Give: Police brutality in America and its consequences

By Nick Barrickman, 12 November 2018

The film addresses itself to the phenomenon of police violence and its effect on a young African-American working class girl and her family.

House of Cards Season 6: The King is dead, long live the Queen!

By Joanne Laurier, 10 November 2018

The sixth and final season of House of Cards is now streaming on Netflix. The firing of lead actor Kevin Spacey along with the #MeToo and anti-Russia campaigns have had a considerable impact on the series.

Orson Welles’s The Other Side of the Wind: A film 48 years in the making

By David Walsh, 8 November 2018

On November 2, Netflix released The Other Side of the Wind, a film directed by Orson Welles, who died in 1985. The footage was shot, with many breaks and delays, from August 1970 to January 1976.