Film Reviews by David Walsh, WSWS Arts Editor

Toronto International Film Festival 2019: Part 5

Steven Soderbergh’s The Laundromat—on the Panama Papers—and The Goldfinch—the aftermath of a terror attack

Along with a valuable film adaptation of Jack London’s Martin Eden and The Traitor, a Mafia drama

By David Walsh, 28 September 2019

Soderbergh discards his generally non-committal stance in The Laundromat, offering a fairly withering critique of global corporate tax evasion and the financial elite generally.

Richard Linklater’s Where’d You Go, Bernadette: A creative “genius” suppresses herself

By David Walsh, 30 August 2019

Bernadette Fox is at odds with her conventional, upper-middle-class environment. She doesn’t care to leave her house much, although the roof leaks badly in various places. She has an antagonistic relationship with a neighbor.

More on the removal of actress Lillian Gish’s name at Bowling Green State University

A conversation with actor Malcolm McDowell: “Once you erode freedoms like this, and artistic thought, where are we as a civilized society?”

By David Walsh, 1 August 2019

The WSWS spoke to veteran actor Malcolm McDowell about the decision by Bowling Green State University to remove actress Lillian Gish’s name from its film theater because of her role in D.W. Griffith’s The Birth of a Nation (1915).

Marching Song, play co-written by Orson Welles about abolitionist John Brown, to be published after 85 years

By David Walsh, 2 July 2019

Todd Tarbox has edited the play and Rowman & Littlefield will publish it in August. This is a significant cultural event. Marching Song is an important historical drama.

All Is True: Kenneth Branagh’s vision of William Shakespeare’s final days

By David Walsh, 5 June 2019

The treatment, unfortunately, is largely leaden and relies on contemporary upper-middle class preoccupations to make sense of—or fail to make sense of—the life of an early 17th century artist.

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote: Terry Gilliam’s latest tribute to non-conformism

By David Walsh, 31 May 2019

Gilliam has famously been attempting to make a film inspired by Don Quixote, the 17th century novel by Spanish writer Miguel de Cervantes, for decades.

Wild Nights with Emily: American poet Emily Dickinson undone by gender politics

By Joanne Laurier and David Walsh, 10 May 2019

By concentrating almost exclusively on Emily Dickinson’s supposed sexual relationship with her sister-in-law, filmmaker Madeleine Olnek and her collaborators recreate the poet in their own petty, self-absorbed image.

Some films from the 2019 San Francisco International Film Festival—Part 1

Paper Flags, Tehran: City of Love and Belmonte—Alienation, loneliness and other problems

By David Walsh, 26 April 2019

Paper Flags, Tehran: City of Love and Belmonte—three films from France, Iran and Uruguay, respectively—were screened at the recent San Francisco film festival.

Freep Film Festival 2019 in Detroit—Part 1

Glimpses of social life: The Feeling of Being Watched, Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool and Bill Traylor: Chasing Ghosts, among others

By David Walsh and Helen Halyard, 17 April 2019

The Detroit film festival organizers made an obvious effort to program works oriented toward contemporary reality and recent social history, including many of their difficult and painful aspects.

Ash is the Purest White: Finding one’s way in “the new ‘capitalist’ China”

And Working Woman from Israel

By David Walsh, 13 April 2019

Jia Zhangke has demonstrated a concern with the fate of workers and others whose lives have been turned upside down by the full integration of China into the global capitalist economy.

Mike Leigh’s Peterloo: A drama of the British working class

By David Walsh, 5 April 2019

The opening of Peterloo in the US this week and next is an event of some importance. The film was inspired by important ideas and created with great seriousness and artistry.

Gus Van Sant’s Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot: The truth hurts

By David Walsh, 3 April 2019

The most recent film by veteran American director Gus Van Sant focuses on quadriplegic cartoonist John Callahan (1951-2010), based on the latter’s memoir.

Captain Marvel: Money, feminism, militarism and previously “independent” filmmakers

By David Walsh, 20 March 2019

The production and release of Captain Marvel, the new science fiction adventure from Marvel and Disney, has a number of remarkable features, but none of them involve the film’s drama, action or characters.

Lady J (Mademoiselle de Joncquières): A scorned woman takes revenge, or attempts to

By David Walsh, 15 March 2019

The film is based on an episode from Jacques the Fatalist and His Master, a novel written by Denis Diderot (1713–1784), the great Enlightenment figure, in the years 1765 to 1780, but not published until after his death.

Why is there so little media skepticism about Leaving Neverland and its allegations against Michael Jackson?

By David Walsh, 6 March 2019

Leaving Neverland consists principally of two men, Wade Robson and James Safechuck, detailing their claims that singer Michael Jackson sexually abused them over the course of many years, in the 1980s and 1990s.

Velvet Buzzsaw: The horror of the art world

By David Walsh, 12 February 2019

Dan Gilroy is one of the more interesting American filmmakers currently working.

Beautiful Boy: Part of the truth about drug addiction

By Joanne Laurier, 30 January 2019

The movie deals with the subject of drug addiction—a national public health emergency and social crisis, and the source of immense suffering.

The 2019 Academy Award nominations: Filmmaking, money and identity politics

By David Walsh, 23 January 2019

The 91st awards ceremony will be held February 24 at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles.

If Beale Street Could Talk: A film version of the James Baldwin novel

By Joanne Laurier, 10 January 2019

The film centers on the love between two African American youth, one of whom faces a police frame-up, in New York City’s Harlem.

Vice: A portrait of an American corporate-military gangster

By David Walsh and Joanne Laurier, 29 December 2018

In regard to the Bush-Cheney administration, the WSWS pointed in the early 2000s to an unprecedented development, the “rise to the pinnacle of the American political system of elements of a gangster character.”

Alfonso Cuarón’s Roma: Art and struggle

By Rafael Azul, 17 December 2018

Roma is a sensitive portrait of a family breaking apart in the broader context of a social crisis. It follows Cleo, a Mixtec Indian, as she performs her daily chores, which include caring for the family’s four children.

Icebox: The US government locks up children

By David Walsh, 11 December 2018

Icebox  focuses on a 12-year-old Honduran boy, Oscar (Anthony Gonzalez), forced by gang activity to flee his home country and head for the US, where an uncle lives.

Submission: A college professor undone by sexual harassment allegations

By David Walsh, 4 December 2018

Given the film’s subject matter, the generally hostile or condescending treatment Submission received at the hands of the major film critics in March 2018 should not have come as a surprise.

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs: Only a fool “expects better” from humanity

By David Walsh, 26 November 2018

The Coens’ latest film is made up of six stories set in a mythical “Old West.” The thread connecting the various episodes is a generally nasty attitude toward humanity, and American humanity in particular.

Web television series Homecoming: Everything about America’s wars, corporate elite is “rotten” …

… And two much weaker series, Maniac and Wanderlust

By David Walsh and Joanne Laurier, 17 November 2018

Homecoming, a compelling, disturbing 10-episode web television series, concerns itself with a facility in Florida that supposedly helps Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans.

What do Tamara Jenkins’ Private Life and Jesse Peretz’s Juliet, Naked have in common?

By David Walsh, 1 November 2018

Each is a relatively unpretentious, low-budget, “independent” film. Each follows a group of middle-class adults as they attempt to navigate certain complicated moral or emotional situations. Each film is slight.

Two short films: The Overcoat, based on the Nikolai Gogol story, and Detainment, about the Jamie Bulger murder case

By David Walsh, 29 October 2018

The Overcoat, directed by Patrick Myles, is based on the famed 1842 short story by Russian author Nikolai Gogol. Detainment treats the aftermath of the killing of a toddler on Merseyside, England in 1993.

Toronto International Film Festival 2018: Part 5

Errol Morris provides Steven Bannon a platform (American Dharma), Werner Herzog celebrates Mikhail Gorbachev (Meeting Gorbachev) and other appalling developments

By David Walsh, 12 October 2018

Certain works either conceal critical features of contemporary life, falsify or are overwhelmed by them.

Toronto International Film Festival 2018: Part 4

Damien Chazelle’s First Man: Reduced in space—and opera singer Maria Callas, the Afghanistan war, small-town America

By Joanne Laurier, 8 October 2018

Damien Chazelle’s First Man—which opens in the US October 12—focuses on US astronaut Neil Armstrong and his role in Apollo 11, the first manned mission to the moon.

Toronto International Film Festival 2018: Part 2

Capernaum, Screwdriver, Rosie, The Public and Black 47: Socially critical films from the Middle East, Ireland and the US

By Joanne Laurier, 1 October 2018

Film writers and directors live in this world too. There must be those who reject upper-middle class triviality and self-involvement.

Toronto International Film Festival 2018: Part 1

An intriguing film festival—above all, Mike Leigh’s Peterloo

By David Walsh, 28 September 2018

The recent Toronto International Film Festival screened some 340 films (including 255 features) from 74 countries.

Toronto International Film Festival 2018

Fahrenheit 11/9—Filmmaker Michael Moore clings to the Democratic Party

By David Walsh, 21 September 2018

Despite various criticisms of leading Democrats and the American liberal establishment as a whole, Moore urges his viewers to retain—or perhaps regain—confidence in the Democratic Party.

Hal: A documentary about American filmmaker Hal Ashby (The Last Detail, Shampoo, Coming Home)

By David Walsh, 18 September 2018

Hal Ashby (1929-88) was an American film director, generally underrated or unrecognized today, responsible for a number of valuable or, in some cases, provocative works in the 1970s.

Bisbee ’17: The deportation of Arizona copper miners is a “still-polarizing event”

By Joanne Laurier, 10 September 2018

In July 1917, 1,200 striking copper miners in Bisbee, Arizona were illegally kidnapped, loaded in cattle cars and dumped in the southwest New Mexico desert. This episode is the subject of Bisbee ’17.

A new film version of Fahrenheit 451: A frightening future world where firefighters set fires

By David Walsh, 23 July 2018

Ramin Bahrani, the Iranian-American filmmaker, has directed a new version of Ray Bradbury’s well-known novel, Fahrenheit 451, published in 1953.

The Seagull: Is there a “Chekhovian mood” at present?

By David Walsh, 30 June 2018

Michael Mayer has directed a new film version of Russian writer Anton Chekhov’s play, The Seagull, written in 1895 and first produced in 1896.

Unequivocally, FOR Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs and AGAINST Avengers: Infinity War

By David Walsh, 5 May 2018

The blindness and stupidity of the identity politics-obsessed upper middle class knows no bounds. This issue comes up most recently in connection with the different critical responses generated by Isle of Dogs and Avengers: Infinity War.

Director of The Loves of a Blonde, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Amadeus

Filmmaker Milos Forman (1932-2018), one of the leading figures of the Czech New Wave

By David Walsh, 16 April 2018

Forman was originally identified with the so-called Czech New Wave, a group of directors whose lively and honest films came to international prominence in the mid-1960s.

Restored version of Fassbinder’s working class drama Eight Hours Don’t Make a Day showing in US

By David Walsh and Joanne Laurier, 9 April 2018

The result is surprisingly optimistic and confident, not what one might have expected from Fassbinder, known for his emotionally dark, harsh and even cynical films.

Japanese animation filmmaker Isao Takahata, director of Grave of the Fireflies, dies at 82

By Elle Chapman and David Walsh, 7 April 2018

Takahata, one of Japan’s most influential animation filmmakers and co-founder of the famed Studio Ghibli, died from lung cancer in a Tokyo hospital April 5. We repost a review of his Grave of the Fireflies (1988).

Armando Iannucci’s The Death of Stalin: A fatally ill-conceived “black comedy”

By David Walsh, 9 March 2018

Ianucci’s new film about the demise of the gravedigger of the Russian Revolution is not so much maliciously anticommunist as it is, above all, historically clueless.

90th Academy Awards: Banal, conformist and 10,000 miles from reality

By David Walsh, 6 March 2018

The 90th Academy Awards ceremony Sunday night, as one media commentator observed, “passed off without a hitch.” How unfortunate.

Director of A World Not Ours, A Man Returned and A Drowning Man

An interview with Palestinian filmmaker Mahdi Fleifel: “A film is like a historical document, it should be solid enough to endure”

By David Walsh, 4 January 2018

Fleifel’s A World Not Ours (2012), Xenos (2014), A Man Returned (2016) and A Drowning Man (2017) are some of the important films currently being made.

Best films of 2017, and other matters

By David Walsh and Joanne Laurier, 30 December 2017

It is impossible to discuss the best films of the year without considering some big social and cultural issues.

Roman J. Israel, Esq.: Rebel with a cause

By Joanne Laurier, 2 December 2017

Dan Gilroy’s Roman J. Israel, Esq. is a legal drama with an anti-establishment slant.

James Cameron’s 1997 film showing in the US for one week

What the WSWS said about Titanic 20 years ago

Why are the critics lauding Titanic?

By David Walsh, 29 November 2017

To mark 20 years since its release in December 1997, James Cameron’s Titanic is being shown in 87 theaters in the US for a week, starting December 1. We are marking the occasion by re-posting two comments on Titanic that appeared on the WSWS in January and February 1998.

What the WSWS said about Titanic 20 years ago

Titanic as a social phenomenon

By David Walsh, 29 November 2017

Originally posted February 25, 1998

Richard Linklater’s Last Flag Flying: The great pressure on artists to pull their punches

By David Walsh, 14 November 2017

The new film, which involves two Vietnam War veterans who help a third bury his son, killed in Iraq, is set in December 2003. It is an indirect sequel of The Last Detail (1973).

George Clooney’s Suburbicon: A misanthropic take on 1950s’ America

By David Walsh, 7 November 2017

A would-be “black comedy,” directed and co-written by George Clooney, Suburbicon is set in 1959 in a bland suburban community.

Toronto International Film Festival: Part 4

The Death of Stalin, The Other Side of Everything, Insyriated—The filmmakers’ inability to deal with complex questions, or worse

By David Walsh, 30 September 2017

Several films on political and historical questions underscore ongoing intellectual and artistic difficulties.

Toronto International Film Festival 2017: Part 2

Directions, Disappearance, A Drowning Man: Realistic about harsh conditions

By David Walsh, 26 September 2017

Certain films at the recent Toronto film festival depict reality in important ways.

Toronto International Film Festival 2017: Part 1

Trouble in paradise: A comment on the economics and politics of the Toronto International Film Festival

By David Walsh, 22 September 2017

This year’s event screened 255 feature films, a 14 percent decline from a year ago, when the festival presented 296 features, and the lowest number of full-length films in a decade.

2017 Emmy Awards: Sean Spicer, self-congratulations and identity politics

By David Walsh, 19 September 2017

The media was more or less agreed Monday that the highlight of the 69th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards was the brief appearance by Trump’s former press secretary.

Sean Penn’s The Last Face and Hollywood’s “August Death March”

By David Walsh, 31 August 2017

The Last Face, about relief workers in Africa, met with a savage critical response at the Cannes film festival. Meanwhile, the American film industry is deservedly suffering through one of its worst summers in decades.

Ingrid Goes West and Wind River: Hardly scratching the surface

By Joanne Laurier, 30 August 2017

Two current films, Ingrid Goes West, a cautionary tale about social media, and Wind River, a murder investigation near a Native American reservation, skirt around significant issues.

Logan Lucky: Steven Soderbergh returns from retirement

By David Walsh, 26 August 2017

The new film is set in West Virginia and North Carolina and involves the robbery of the Charlotte Motor Speedway during a major race.

Jerry Lewis, comic and filmmaker, dead at 91

By David Walsh, 23 August 2017

Lewis was a performer of extraordinary talent. At his improvisational and manic best, with a rapid-fire delivery, a variety of personas and all manner of physical contortions, he represented something anarchic and disruptive.

Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk: The outbreak of World War II without history or politics

By David Walsh, 26 July 2017

British director Nolan’s new film is about the famed evacuation of large numbers of British and French troops from northern France in May-June 1940.

My Cousin Rachel: Was she innocent or guilty—and what would it signify?

By David Walsh, 17 June 2017

Roger Michell’s film, based on the 1951 novel by Daphne du Maurier set in the 19th century, follows a callow young man who falls for his sophisticated, perhaps calculating older “cousin.”

Three intriguing new films that should not disappear unnoticed: Sami Blood, Past Life and Radio Dreams

By David Walsh, 10 June 2017

Most of the films in movie theaters in the US at the moment are poor, or worse. As a result, the public is increasingly turning away. But there are exceptions.

Barry Levinson’s The Wizard of Lies on HBO: The tame, New York Times’ version of the Madoff scandal

By David Walsh, 1 June 2017

The HBO film is an account of the downfall of Wall Street swindler Bernard Madoff, whose multi-billion-dollar stock and securities fraud unraveled in December 2008.

Risk: Laura Poitras’ confused, superficial documentary about Julian Assange and WikiLeaks

By David Walsh and Joanne Laurier, 11 May 2017

The film broaches a dozen subjects and avoids treating any of them in depth, and often fails to take a clear position of any kind.

San Francisco International Film Festival—Part 4

Dziga Vertov’s The Man with a Movie Camera: One of the films you must see!

By David Walsh and Joanne Laurier, 6 May 2017

A highlight of the recent San Francisco film festival was the screening of Soviet filmmaker Dziga Vertov’s masterpiece, The Man with a Movie Camera (1929), at the historic Castro Theatre.

Lecture at San Diego State University

Should art be judged on the basis of race and gender?

By David Walsh, 27 April 2017

This is an edited version of a talk given at San Diego State University on April 18 by WSWS arts editor David Walsh. Audio of the talk is included.

San Francisco International Film Festival—Part 1

By David Walsh, 26 April 2017

The 2017 San Francisco International Film Festival screened some 180 films from 50 countries or so. This is the first of several articles.

230 DW lecture video

24 April 2017

San Diego Latino Film Festival—Part 1

Films on social life, past and present, in Mexico, the US and Peru

By Kevin Martinez and Toby Reese, 3 April 2017

The festival screened films from Mexico, Cuba, Spain, Venezuela, Colombia, Canada, Argentina, Chile, Ecuador, Puerto Rico, Peru, Honduras, Brazil, the US and other countries.

An interview with Jose Ramon Pedroza, director of Los Jinetes Del Tiempo (Time Riders)

By Kevin Martinez and Toby Reese, 3 April 2017

The WSWS conducted an interview with Mexican film director Jose Ramon Pedroza.

Revolution: New Art for a New World—A careless, unserious treatment of Russian Revolutionary art

By Joanne Laurier and David Walsh, 17 March 2017

British filmmaker Margy Kinmonth is out of her depth in her documentary about Russian avant-garde art.

89th Academy Awards: What does Hollywood offer today?

By David Walsh, 28 February 2017

The 89th Academy Awards ceremony, held Sunday at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, was an even more complex and peculiar affair than usual.

The Founder: Hollywood’s love affair with Ray Kroc and McDonald's

By Joanne Laurier, 26 January 2017

John Lee Hancock’s The Founder is a biographical drama about Ray Kroc, known as the man who established the McDonald’s global fast food chain.

New York Times film critics watch “while white”

Against racialism in film and art

By David Walsh, 19 January 2017

It would be very nearly possible at present to post a daily column devoted to the fixation of the American media and Hollywood filmmaking with race.

Best films of 2016

By David Walsh and Joanne Laurier, 31 December 2016

Although technologies have sped up and made possible many things, they cannot by themselves overcome the gap between reality and its artistic assimilation and representation.

Carrie Fisher and the Star Wars phenomenon

By David Walsh, 29 December 2016

The announcement Tuesday that Carrie Fisher had died at only 60 was sad news. The actress, writer and humorist was an appealing figure and personality.

Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk: Ang Lee on the Iraq war and American hoopla

By David Walsh, 15 November 2016

The drama takes place in 2004. A unit of American soldiers, who have survived a brief but fierce battle with Iraqi insurgents, are being celebrated as “heroes” on a nationwide tour.

American Pastoral: A film version of Philip Roth’s novel

By David Walsh, 29 October 2016

The film and novel follow the life and eventual terrible misfortune of Seymour “Swede” Levov, the son of a glove manufacturer in Newark, in the 1960s and 1970s.

Toronto International Film Festival 2016: Part 2

The Chosen, on Trotsky, and other political subjects

By David Walsh, 29 September 2016

The appearance of an honest and accurate film about the plot to assassinate Russian revolutionary Leon Trotsky in Mexico in 1940 is a welcome—and long overdue—event.

Toronto International Film Festival 2016: Part 1

How well does filmmaking reflect present-day life?

By David Walsh, 27 September 2016

This year’s Toronto International Film Festival screened some 400 feature and short films from 83 countries at 1,200 public screenings.

Oliver Stone’s Snowden: The NSA is “running a dragnet on the whole world”

By Joanne Laurier and David Walsh, 20 September 2016

Veteran American filmmaker Oliver Stone has made a movie about National Security Agency (NSA) whistleblower Edward Snowden.

Suicide Squad: The latest comic book film

By David Walsh, 10 August 2016

David Ayer’s film concerns a team of psychotics and criminals recruited by the US government as part of a top-secret program to combat terrorism.

Wiener-Dog: Todd Solondz continues to look critically at American life

By David Walsh, 20 July 2016

The new film comprises four stories, loosely linked by the presence of a “wiener-dog” (dachshund). Each has at least one or more satirical, telling moments or elements.

The life and career of Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami

By David Walsh, 14 July 2016

The Iranian director will be best remembered and long honored for the series of feature films, including documentaries, that he made between 1987 and 1997.

Genius: “Just simply corny”

By David Walsh, 2 July 2016

British director Michael Grandage’s film is about American novelist Thomas Wolfe (Jude Law) and his famous editor, Maxwell Perkins (Colin Firth).

Charles Blow of the New York Times

The right-wing, racialist attacks on the film Free State of Jones

By David Walsh, 30 June 2016

Free State of Jones, about a white farmer in Mississippi who led an insurrection against the Confederacy from 1863 to 1865, has come under sharp attack from the “new right” of identity politics advocates.

Free State of Jones: Three cheers!

By Joanne Laurier, 28 June 2016

Gary Ross’s film is a fictional account of an intriguing, but little known chapter in American history.

“All the terrifying things all really happened”

Toyen: A film about the Czech surrealist painter and her times

By David Walsh, 18 June 2016

Czech director Jan Němec, who died in March 2016, made a film about the surrealist painter Toyen in 2005, which is now available. The film is intriguing and sometimes deeply moving.

The Nice Guys: Something, but not very much

(And, briefly, Terence Davies’ Sunset Song and Hany Abu-Assad’s The Idol.)

By David Walsh and Joanne Laurier, 17 June 2016

The Nice Guys is set in 1977 and follows the investigation into a disappearance, which turns out to be part of a broader conspiracy. Sunset Song and The Idol have recently opened in movie theaters in the US.

The Lobster: Relationships forced on—or forbidden—people

By David Walsh, 11 June 2016

In Yorgos Lanthimos’ film, individuals without a mate are sent to a “hotel” where they have 45 days to find a partner or be turned into an animal. Then, there are those who escape.

Sing Street from Ireland, A Bigger Splash from Italy: Neglected realities

By Joanne Laurier, 28 May 2016

John Carney’s Sing Street is a musical comedy-drama set in Dublin in the mid-1980s. Italian filmmaker Luca Guadagnino’s A Bigger Splash, based on a 1969 French thriller, takes its name from a painting by British artist David Hockney.

High-Rise: A film version of J.G. Ballard’s novel

By David Walsh, 27 May 2016

Like the novel, the film—set in the mid-1970s—begins with its central character calmly sitting on the balcony of his 25th floor apartment eating roast dog.

Captain America: Civil War—A waste of resources, technology and human skill

By David Walsh, 23 May 2016

What are these performers doing in this film? Is there any major film actor at present who would say “No” to this sort of project?

San Francisco International Film Festival—Part 3

Radio Dreams, about Iranian Americans—and the problem of images without insight

By David Walsh, 17 May 2016

Radio Dreams is a pleasurable experience. Other films at the San Francisco festival––The Event, No Home Movie, Counting, Five Nights in Maine––fared less well.

An interview with Babak Jalali, director of Radio Dreams

By David Walsh, 17 May 2016

The WSWS spoke to Babak Jalali during the recent San Francisco International Film Festival.

San Francisco International Film Festival 2016—Part 1

Look at today’s filmmaking … then look at the world

By David Walsh, 11 May 2016

The recent San Francisco International Film Festival, in its 59th edition, screened some 175 films, including approximately 100 feature-length films, from 46 countries.

Retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York

Are the films of Jean-Marie Straub and Danièle Huillet a genuine alternative to contemporary filmmaking?

By David Walsh, 7 May 2016

The Museum of Modern Art in New York City, beginning May 6, is presenting a retrospective of the films of Jean-Marie Straub and Danièle Huillet, the Franco-German filmmakers.

Papa: Hemingway in Cuba—The banalization of the novelist and his art

By David Walsh, 4 May 2016

The film follows the relationship that develops after a young American journalist in Miami in the mid-1950s writes an admiring letter to novelist Ernest Hemingway, then living in Havana, Cuba.

SEP/IYSSE meetings in California: Art, War and Social Revolution

14 April 2016

WSWS Arts Editor David Walsh will speak at meetings in San Diego and Berkeley, California, addressing the political and cultural situation in relation to American imperialism’s relentless war drive.

San Diego Latino Film Festival 2016—Part 1

Films from Argentina, Spain and Guatemala: El Movimiento, Hablar, Ixcanul and Tras Nazarin

By Kevin Martinez and Toby Reese, 28 March 2016

The festival showcased films and documentaries from throughout the Spanish-speaking world, including Cuba, Spain, Mexico, South and Central America.

Terrence Malick’s Knight of Cups: It is impossible to learn anything from this

By David Walsh, 19 March 2016

Thematically and stylistically, Malick’s latest film follows in the footsteps of his two previous efforts, The Tree of Life (2011) and To the Wonder (2012).

Race: Jesse Owens and the 1936 Berlin Olympics

By Alan Gilman and David Walsh, 10 March 2016

Stephen Hopkins’ film centers on critical events in the life of African-American track and field legend Jesse Owens.